spark & corruption.

at the end of the day, the excitement that flares in people’s eyes at the sight of you, is the only thing you’ve got left.

I stepped into private education feeling weary; I was paying for something many people get for free, or for a very small fee. Perhaps the money factor would raise the quality of the knowledge; make it overall better-rounded and more effectively understood. I expected the teachers to be experts in their field. I stepped in with expectations.

I was met with friendliness, but a powdered smile often didn’t tell me enough of what I needed to know.

Until one day the smile vanished, to be replaced with sheepish guilt.

To cut a frightfully long story short; we were to be certified by a Britsh organisation for a “small fee” of three hundred. People seem bummed out, to say the least.

 


 

But at least I got to discuss this corruption with the Taekwondo kid. I earned one of George’s passionate nods. He agreed it was a strategic omission. I said, “that just subtracted about ten points.” He said, “If not more.”

He vanished into the sunlight before I could say goodbye.

The sun is one peculiar thing; I tend to despise it when lacking sunglasses, but in all other situations, it’s the most vital ingredient of peace. A small room overlooking a smaller city completely enveloped by the sun, with its hot rays washing over every roof and empty road, is my idea of personal paradise.

I came for that, and stayed for the aftermath. My heart burned through all of it; in fact, it still does. The last time my heart burned in a similar fashion was prior to a driving exam. I missed and dreaded the feeling.

In theory, people like unexpected good things that happen. It depends heavily on one’s perception to decide what’s an unexpected good thing, but most people can agree surprises are a great childhood dream come true.

And some will say they suck.

I’m not sure which scenario I expected when I signed myself up for failure.

But the moment it happened I knew. A switch went off, and emotions I’d left in a deep slumber resurfaced for the first time in a while.

I was preparing for a storm.

I wasn’t re-enforcing the boat or stocking it up with canned foods; I wasn’t retreating belowdeck to keep my skin dry.

I was already mouth-deep in the saltwater, abandoning ship.

 

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